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2016 Proceedings

2016 Urban Education Conference Proceedings
Education Technology

 

Terra Science and Education in conjunction with the Syracuse University brought leading Educational Technology experts, Bob Regan and Dr. Scott McLeod, as keynotes for the 2016 Syracuse Educational Technology Conference Thursday, November 10, 2016 at the Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel and Conference Center.

This year’s conference focused on topics ranging from “Assistive Technology” to “Will teachers be replaced by robots?” Participants spent the day learning about the latest Educational Technology research and collaborating with other professionals and experts to develop best practices to bring back to the classroom.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

Bob Regan, Director, BGC3 (Bill Gates Catalyst 3)

Keynote: Insights from the Big History Project
The Big History Project looks to make thoughtful use of technology to address some of the more persistent challenges in education. From professional development, to reading & writing and assessment, the Big History Project has looked to create a program combining strategies new and old to create powerful experiences for teachers and students. Bob Regan will review some of the strategies used in the course and discuss implications for teachers. More than a textbook, the Big History Project has become a vibrant professional learning community where teachers from a variety of disciplines, grades and even countries collaborate to review the materials and discuss strategies. Among the more interesting work has been an effort to develop reading and writing skills for students within a highly challenging subject. Bob will review the strategies and research results and discuss feedback from teachers. In addition, Bob will discuss some of the challenges teachers have faced with a course that spans 13.8 Billion years and 12 different disciplines. Positioning teachers as the lead learner, and the driver has proven to be essential and Bob will review some of the strategies for achieving this kind of culture.

Breakout Session: Reading and writing strategies from the Big History Project

Following up on the keynote, Bob will explore some of the materials from the course in greater depth, as well as the programs from which the course draws these resources. While many history teachers don’t think of themselves as teaching reading and writing, there is an increasing focus within emerging standards. This session will look at professional development offerings and explore how they might be replicated at the school or disciplinary level, looking at the data from the course. Bob will review reading and writing materials from the course and talk about how these strategies are introduced to students and teachers alike.

Dr. Scott McLeod, Professor, University of Colorado

Keynote: Key questions about personalized learning, blended learning, and the present/future of STEM education

Blended learning proponents hold wide-ranging views of how to best use digital technologies to enhance student learning. Where do you fall on the spectrum?! Join us for a lively, interactive keynote about the true meanings of 'personalized learning' in STEM education. Be prepared to discuss, debate, and share with each other!

Breakout Session: Redesigning STEM lessons to enhance deeper learning and student agency

We have a lot of technology floating around our schools and classrooms these days. And while that can and should be a good thing given the digital age in which we now live, we often find that our technology-related efforts aren’t paying off for us as we had hoped. This workshop is for secondary educators who wish to push their technology-infused pedagogy to new levels. We will blow right through TPACK and SAMR and use the trudacot question-and-discussion protocol to design and redesign lessons across various grade levels and subject areas. THIS is where the powerful conversations occur; THIS is the work we need to be doing as educators. We will use actual lesson plans and video exemplars to facilitate our work. Bring a willingness to rethink learning and teaching, a lack of defensiveness, and, if possible, a laptop or Chromebook that will work with Google Sheets.

Breakout Session: Will teachers be replaced by robots?

They’re already in medicine, law, transportation, banking, sales, service, and other industries... Are the bots coming for us too? We'll watch a short film or two, look at data, and dive into a discussion about workforce and economy needs. Our conversation will have a special focus on education jobs and adaptive learning systems. 

Dr. Alan Foley, Professor, Syracuse University

Breakout Session: Assistive Technolgy

The use of mobile devices as assistive technology for students with visual impairments in resource-limited environments. This
session provides initial data and analysis from an ongoing project in Kenya using tablet devices to provide access to education and independence for university students with visual impairments in Kenya. 

Dr. Jing Lei, Professor, Syracuse University.

Digital Citizenship: Technology Competencies in the Digital Era

Modern information and communication technology is changing our society in two ways: one is through creating an ever-expanding virtual world that expands the scope of our activities, and one is through digitalizing every aspect of our daily life and work in the traditional physical world. The boundaries of these two worlds are blurring and we are living in an increasingly digitalized era, in which technology is quickly surpassing human beings in terms of efficiency, effectiveness, and cost-saving in more and more areas, replacing existing occupations and creating new jobs. Then, how can schools sufficiently prepare competent workers for occupations that are not in existence yet or that are going to change? What are the essential skills, knowledge, and abilities that students must acquire to successfully live and work in an ever-changing world? What talents will be most useful and valued?

This presentation will critique on the traditional approach of viewing technology mostly as a tool and teaching technology as a curriculum, and then propose a new approach of preparing digitally competent citizens: Digital Citizenship. Digital citizenship is the ability to live in the digital world productively and be a contributing member to the society. It includes the following fundamental elements: (a) knowledge of the nature of the digital world; (b) positive attitude toward the digital world; (c) ability to use different tools to participate in the digital world; and (d) ability to use different tools to create digital products and to lead in the digital world. specific examples will be given to define and illustrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities that citizens of the digital era must acquire.

Laurel Chiesa, Director of Technology at Fayetteville-Manlius School District

Digital Portfolios

Assess student work more comprehensively. Provide documentation of growth to parents. Inform future teachers with student created artifacts.

Digital portfolios are a holistic way of assessing a student while heightening student self-reflection. Discover how digital portfolios can be used from year to year to inform teachers and instruction while providing documentation. Learn how Google, Adobe and free web publishing sites can be used as a digital portfolio. Implementation planning and tutorials will be provided

Dr. Tiffany Koszalka, Professor, Syracuse University

Designing and Using Digital Learning Resources to Prompt Critical Thinking

This session will focus on engaging the audience in thinking about the form and substance of digital learning resources. How should learners engage with digital resources to enter into critical thinking and deep LEARNING of the subject matter? Shouldn’t learning resources prompt hands-on minds-on learning, foster flexible thinking, stimulate reflective thinking, and engage learners at the intended level of learning? This is your opportunity to review, critique, and share opinions about the characteristics of digital resources … and look at how do the digital resources you use “measure up” to learning outcomes expectations. We will end with a review of things you might do to help your students learn more deeply with the digital resources you use in your instruction. 

Dr. Ugur Kocak, Dean of High School, Syracuse Academy of Science

Student Engagement with 1:1 Tablet Computer-Based Teaching in the Secondary English, History, and Mathematics Classrooms: Multiple Case Studies of a Program Implementation

The use of 1:1 tablet computer-based teaching is a rapidly increasing trend in education that calls for urgent examination, because such a fundamental change in teaching deeply impacts student learning and school budgets. The purpose of this study was to examine how 1:1 tablet computer-based teaching helps or hinders students’ procedural engagement in learning in English, mathematics and history classrooms at a high school. The study employed a qualitative case study method to collect data about this new pedagogical approach without changing existing classroom settings. In these classrooms, the students were expected to take notes on tablets, work on digital copies of practice worksheets, and read text from electronic textbooks. The study found that a large portion of the student population, varying somewhat among subject areas , utilized tablet computers for non-educational purposes during instructional time and teachers were unable to identify such misuse of tablets. The results also reveal that most students would like to continue learning with 1:1 tablet computers because of the tablet computers’ affordances, such as the ability to access multiple resources anytime, anywhere; organize learning materials; and track assignment submissions and grades. In conclusion, along with the various affordances that tablet computers offer for teaching, they divert a large portion of the students’ procedural engagement in the English, mathematics, and history classrooms. Recommendations for practice address the need for educators to look for alternative ways to more productively use tablet computers in teaching, rather than the current manner and utilizing tablet computers for interactive or student centered lessons to improve students’ procedural engagement. This can be achieved by providing teachers adequate training and time to prepare productive tablet computer-based lessons. In addition, integrating a software program that allows the teachers to control and monitor the students’ tablet computers is so crucial to prevent tablet-driven distractions. Last an experienced technical support team needs to be available to promptly address technical problems that the teachers or students experience. This will encourage the teachers to prepare lessons relying on tablet computers.

TERRA URBAN EDUCATION CONFERENCES --- EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY- Syracuse, November-2016

Bob Regan, Director, BGC3 (Bill Gates Catalyst 3)

Keynote: Insights from the Big History Project

Download  

Watch

 

Dr. Scott McLeod, Professor, University of Colorado

Keynote: Key questions about personalized learning, blended learning, and the present/future of STEM education

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Other materials

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Dr. Jing Lei, Professor, Syracuse University

Digital Citizenship: Technology Competencies in the Digital Era

 

Laurel Chiesa, Director of Technology at Fayetteville-Manlius School District

Digital Portfolios

 

Dr. Tiffany Koszalka, Professor, Syracuse University

Designing and Using Digital Learning Resources to Prompt Critical Thinking

Download

 

Download

The content of these papers is owned by the RIDLR team at Syracuse University. Permission was granted by RIDLR to reproduce these materials on the Terra Foundation websites. Others may not duplicate, print, or post this information in any form, digital or non-digital, except for personal or educational uses, without permission. You may freely provide a link to these materials from your own site. In citing this work please use the following citation (you may modify the format based on your publication style): Koszalka, T. (Nov. 2016). Designing and using digital learning resources to prompt critical thinking. Terra Foundation Educational Technology Conference, Syracuse, NY.

Dr. Ugur Kocak, Dean of High School, Syracuse Academy of Science

1:1 Tablet Computer-Based Teaching

 

 

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